Making Information Unforgettable: the Routines of Learning

How do you make information completely unforgettable?

I’m talking “in 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue” kind of unforgettable. In a world where attention and being memorable matters more each day, how do you stand out?

Let’s take a look at this psychologically: when the brain is confronted with new information, it has to digest that new information somehow, it has to “learn” something. Learning Astrophysics? Physiology? How to wear a tie? What is the nature of reality? You have to start digging into these immense topics with some kind of cognitive tool, otherwise it’s just a flash that you forget–kind of like the majority of interruption marketing that we see.

Only when the brain starts to “learn” something can it remember something. Let that sink in. Unless your marketing is actually “teaching” the brain something, it will not stick. In essence, by “teaching” the brain something, you are earning psychological permission to take up space in the neural networks of your students. Effective teachers, by profession, are those that promote the greatest amount of learning. They have become masters of helping our subconscious digest information quickly and turn it into actionable, memorable and concrete information. By contrast, ineffective teachers spend most of their time is spent saying, “pay attention.” And no, students really aren’t going to respond to that request.

So what are is the cognitive trick to making information completely unforgettable? There are only three, so it’s easy to remember. These are called the routines of learning. That is to say, they are the cognitive processes that help us digest new information and make it extraordinarily memorable. Over the next couple of days I’m going to write about how to use each of them in our marketing. They are:

  • I see; I wonder
  • Compare and contrast
  • The parts and the whole

They don’t have a lot of meaning just yet, but I guarantee that you will find them very powerful in the coming weeks.

FYI, this blog post was inspired by what Harvard Scholars have done as part of the Visible Thinking project, so I must give them their due credit.

 

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